Are spas conning the public?

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Are spas conning the public?

Postby Dragonflies on Thu Mar 04, 2010 5:34 am

Just thought I'd share Kevin's blog post from yesterday: Are spas conning the public?
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Shannon on Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:52 am

I think so. I worked at a spa that had reflexology on the list of services. I am not certified nor trained in it. I learned a lil bit in school but not enough to know what I am doing.
When I told them I didn't feel comfortable doing it,they told to just "wing" it. :irked:
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby GreenDragonfly on Thu Mar 04, 2010 1:54 pm

I agree and say it is a 'con'. As consumers become more educated as to what Reflexology IS and ISN'T, they will be harder pressed to explain their unethical practices.

I just completed a 3 day training workshop in reflexology. I can now competently give a decent generic 'treatment' - however, until I have sufficient study time put in and take the actual reflexology coursework recommended by the Reflexology Association of IL, I will not consider myself a reflexologist or advertise myself as a reflexologist.
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby RelaxandRejuvenate on Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:31 pm

By using this reasoning, any massage therapist not NCBTMB certified could be accused of conning the public as well.

not sure we want to go there...
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Dragonflies on Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:33 pm

RelaxandRejuvenate wrote:By using this reasoning, any massage therapist not NCBTMB certified could be accused of conning the public as well.

not sure we want to go there...

But we're not talking massage here, this is about Reflexology.
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Timedess on Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:20 pm

RelaxandRejuvenate wrote:By using this reasoning, any massage therapist not NCBTMB certified could be accused of conning the public as well.

not sure we want to go there...


I saw no mention of NCBTMB in the article. (For the record, I understand that the reference to NCBTMB is in regard to the concept of "single-organization oversight", as opposed to "picking on Reflexology per se". ANY modality could be substituted for Reflexology in this discussion.)

I don't know about other states, but here it is illegal (not to mention unethical) to advertise oneself as proficient in a modality or technique you aren't trained in. Hence I can advertise myself as a "Certified Prenatal Massage Therapist", because I AM certified- I have gone to the classes and have the proof of that hanging on my wall. My husband, OTOH, "can do prenatal massage" (and was actually quite good at it when I was pregnant), but he would be remiss to claim that he's "certified" or that he "specializes" in it. We are very careful, if one of us "has had some training" in something, to say just that- not claiming certification or "specialization" in something we've had "some training" in. Doesn't mean we can't use that technique in our sessions, but to claim "Yes, I DO Cranio-Sacral Massages" (or Reflexology, or Lymphatic Drainage, or Thai Massage, or whatever), if we haven't had the training in it, would be false advertising.

IMO, if a spa/facility/therapist offers "Reflexology" (or any other "specialized modality"), the person giving that advertised service should be trained it what they're giving. If someone calls wanting to book a Reflexology appointment, they ought to book that appointment with a staff member *who is trained in Reflexology*. If said staff member is not available (or nonexistent), then the spa needs to either stop offering that service, or find someone who has the training. Stuff like that makes ALL bodyworkers look bad.

And just for the record, I'm not suggesting a need for "NCBTMB-type certification" in any/all modalities. I mean "verifiable proof that the therapist has received X amount of education" in any particular modality, and yes, for different schools/CE providers, that will mean different things. But to lack ANY training in something one is offering to the public, and to go on as though they're "proficient" in it, is defrauding the public. And if one has received X amount of training in something, one should be honest about that "I have had A COURSE in that modality", as opposed to a generic "yeah, I've been trained in that" when they've only received 6 hours in something others have gone to school for hundreds of hours to get certification in. As our "lipstick case" of training in any given area gets more "notches" in it, our conversation/advertising can (and should!) expand and change to reflect that fact.

Just my :2cents: .
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby RelaxandRejuvenate on Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:59 pm

I was not referring to the article, i was referring to the concept of "certification"

In the absence of any standard set forth by a controlling authority -- namely your state or local goverment -- who is to say who is certified and who is not.

Lots of folks on this board rail against licensure, claiming the gift of being a "natural healer" and how having NCBTMB certification proves nothing more than the ability to pass a test.

how is this principle any different when applied to reflexology?
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby GreenDragonfly on Thu Mar 04, 2010 9:12 pm

My comment regarding certification was made in respect to the profession of reflexologists and what is deemed to be appropriate education as voted by them as an organization. I can only speak for myself, but I feel that if I am going to say I am a "Reflexologist" that I should abide by their standards as they have set forth - otherwise I should make up some OTHER word and say I am an expert at that :)
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby RelaxandRejuvenate on Fri Mar 05, 2010 5:03 am

GreenDragonfly wrote: but I feel that if I am going to say I am a "Reflexologist" that I should abide by their standards as they have set forth - otherwise I should make up some OTHER word and say I am an expert at that :)


And the words spas use is they offer reflexology, which does not hold out any practitioners as "Reflexologists"

A GP can treat you for allergies without being an Allergist.

where's the con?
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby [email protected] on Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:25 am

I absolutely agree that it is con to some degree. The spa I worked for offers reflexology (we have 1 certified reflexologist), and one day I was scheduled a reflexology session. I explained to the Spa manager that while I had taken a little bit of training and I had read techniques and seen some video that I was not an actual reflexologist. She told me "the client wouldn't know, and to just give him a deep foot massage". I was not happy with this response. I told her that I would tell the client I was doing a "Swedish and reflexology blended session" because that is what I felt comfortable giving, and if that wasn't ok with her she would have to reschedule the appt with our certified reflexologist. She was ok with that. I explained to the client during his session that our specialist wasn't available, but that I could demo a bit about it, and then mix in some other different styles of massage. I talked to him about the theory of reflexology and I made sure to pass on our other therapists card to him when he left.

Personally I am ok with telling clients I have "some experience in the field" and would be happy to show and use what I know, but that if they are looking specifically for someone who does whatever work, I will be happy to refer them.
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Laura. on Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:30 am

by touting massage by a licensed massage therapist, the implication given to the public is that they will be treated by a trained professional. if one modality is offered by a licensed professional, all modalities should be held to the same standard or clearly stated as otherwise in an effort of full disclosure. purposely leaving out certain information because it could dissuade the consumer is absolutely deceitful and in my opinion unethical.

i think the con clearly lies in the situation explained by shannon. if the spa knowingly allows an undereducated practitioner (by the MT's own standards) perform reflexology or any other service without informing the paying client of such then they are being deceitful.
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby GreenDragonfly on Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:37 pm

RelaxandRejuvenate wrote:
GreenDragonfly wrote: but I feel that if I am going to say I am a "Reflexologist" that I should abide by their standards as they have set forth - otherwise I should make up some OTHER word and say I am an expert at that :)


And the words spas use is they offer reflexology, which does not hold out any practitioners as "Reflexologists"

A GP can treat you for allergies without being an Allergist.

where's the con?


It's deceitful. The only way your analogy would work is if the GP offered some other type of treatment for allergy that had nothing to do with any known allergy treatment and just hope that the patient didn't notice the bait and switch.
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby peacenut on Sat Mar 06, 2010 6:54 pm

Laura. wrote:by touting massage by a licensed massage therapist, the implication given to the public is that they will be treated by a trained professional. if one modality is offered by a licensed professional, all modalities should be held to the same standard or clearly stated as otherwise in an effort of full disclosure. purposely leaving out certain information because it could dissuade the consumer is absolutely deceitful and in my opinion unethical.


Doctors, teachers, clergy, and President Clinton.

They all have training that comes with standards. Training doesn't make you more professional, but some people will fall for it!

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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Laura. on Sun Mar 07, 2010 6:03 am

yeah.... ok. but i wasn't trying to debate the value of licensure - and i don't think that's the core issue here. knowingly providing something other than advertised or is naturally and reasonably assumed by an advertisement is deceitful - which fits webster's definition of "con". and this speaks to a broader issue of consumer rights being trampled on by large corporations - don't consumers have a right to full disclosure? maybe you and i disagree on this issue. :smt109
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Re: Are spas conning the public?

Postby Dragonflies on Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:44 am

So here's Karen Ball's input on trying to pass off a foot massage as reflexology:
If you’re not trained in reflexology, it’s better to give a top-notch foot massage and call it just that, rather than discredit yourself, your employer and the profession.

from Reflexology and Massage Around the World
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