becoming a reflexologist

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becoming a reflexologist

Postby morningglory on Tue Sep 05, 2006 12:11 am

Hello! I posted already on another forum, but I thought I would post here too. I am greatly looking forward to making a career change, and am hoping to study either reflexology or Thai massage. I wondered if I could ask some questions here about reflexology.

The programs near me are about 200 hours, and they say they are certified courses. Is this enough to be a practitioner or do you need a MT license as well? I am going to call the schools today as well.

Also, with time is it possible to support yourself as a reflexologist, or is it good to learn other modalities as well? Do many reflexologists work for others are is it best to be self employed?

I know that so much of this depends on the area you live in, but any thoughts would be much appreciated!
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Re: becoming a reflexologist

Postby Dragonflies on Tue Sep 05, 2006 5:36 am

Congratulations on considering this modality for a career change! We welcome your questions and I hope you'll find some of the answers you're looking for.

morningglory wrote:The programs near me are about 200 hours, and they say they are certified courses. Is this enough to be a practitioner or do you need a MT license as well? I am going to call the schools today as well.

This depends on State and sometimes Municipal requirements for bodyworkers. In this thread you'll find a link to the Kunz' 2004 report on City/State requirements. This is a good start, but you'll want to verify that the information hasn't changed for your state/city. Though most schools should have this information they may not, or you may not get the full story. I would strongly suggest that you check your local and/or state requirements for yourself and make sure it's in writing somewhere.

morningglory wrote:Also, with time is it possible to support yourself as a reflexologist, or is it good to learn other modalities as well? Do many reflexologists work for others are is it best to be self employed?

Personally I am self-employed and practice only Reflexology, this works really well for me and I am able to support myself now. It really depends on the person though, if you're very good at being independent then you might do well being self-employed. If the thought of booking clients and dealing with payments at the end of a session makes you run then you'd probably do much better working for someone else. :)

I hope some of our other Reflexologists here will answer your questions too. You might also check out this email group on Reflexology.
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thank you

Postby morningglory on Tue Sep 05, 2006 10:21 pm

Thank you for your answer. It is certainly encouraging. I called the schools I was interested in but they said reflexology was considered continuing education and it was best to do MT first. I am going to check around to some other ones today. Thanks for the links, I will look into them right now.
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re

Postby morningglory on Tue Sep 05, 2006 10:25 pm

I looked at the legal requirements site, and it looks like the state I live in does not have laws or requirements. What does this mean? That anyone can practice? Does this mean you also get people who can call themselves a reflexologist and not have any proper training? Can you still get insurance? Sorry for so many questions!
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Re: re

Postby Dragonflies on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:49 am

morningglory wrote:I looked at the legal requirements site, and it looks like the state I live in does not have laws or requirements. What does this mean? That anyone can practice? Does this mean you also get people who can call themselves a reflexologist and not have any proper training? Can you still get insurance? Sorry for so many questions!

Keeping in mind that the information on that site is two years old, it could mean that there is no state law governing bodywork practices in your state. Usually there are county or municipal laws when a state law doesn't exist.

Many people use the term reflexology without proper training, just like massage. There are only a few states/cities that have very strict requirements to use the terms "reflexology" and "reflexologist."

Insurance depends on the requirements of the insurance provider. There is a thread here about insurance for reflexologists.

I wonder why the school would have a 200 hour reflexology program that grants a certificate at the end and then tell you that it is continuing education. Are there any independent reflexology schools near you? They might be able to help answer some of your questions. In the very least they won't be trying to get you to sign up for more programs than you actually need to legally practice after graduation. Just a thought.
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