heating massage stones

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heating massage stones

Postby kathryn on Tue Feb 21, 2006 10:23 am

Hiya All,

I will be attending a lastone class soon and am not sure whether to purchase a skillet or roaster to warm the stones. I plan on using stone therapy often.

So, for those of you who practice stone therapy which do you prefer: a roaster or skillet and why?

Thanks for your help
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Re: heating massage stones

Postby SalemRose on Tue Feb 21, 2006 2:19 pm

A roaster, actually, I've never seen anyone use a skillet! Huh. Anyway, I got a nice 18 qt roaster from WalMart for under $20!!! At work we have a large roaster and then a small crockpot. I use the crock pot when I am doing spot treatments with the stones and not a full body massage. Nice to have on hand. Less clean up.

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Postby melb on Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:16 pm

If you want to project a professional image, do you think a fry pan that someone may have in their own kitchen looks professional? LaStone don't recommend skillets. www.healingstonemassage.com do recommend using skillets. The stainless steel roasters sold as stone heaters seem to be a normal roaster, with a different name on the front. The stainless steel does make it a bit more clinical, plus, since stainless steel roasters are more expensive than a coloured one, there will be less people to think "I've got one of them in my kitchen" Personally I'd pay extra and get a stainless steel insert for the roaster - too much teflon in everything already, and you don't need a non-stick surface in a stone heater.

I know the stone heater I'd get if money and voltage were no object - the Amber one.... http://www.spaequip.com/store/Stone_Heaters.jsp
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Postby moogie on Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:28 pm

I use two skillets and I have NEVER had a client comment that they thought it was somehow unprofessional. I have had a few say something like "oh, are you making me lunch too?" to which I reply "yes, we're having Stone Soup." I started using the skillets because that was the way I was taught in the seminar I took. The benefit with the skillets is:

1) I use two of them so I can have stones at two different temperatures. The smaller one at a higher temp to use while massaging and the larger one at a lower temp to use as layout stones. Since they stay laying on the client (or the client laying on them) they need to be warm without being hot enough to burn the client.

2) The depth is just enough to cover the stones without having so much water that you have to dig around for them. Also by using a skillet I don't have to deal with wearing those awful rubber gloves since I'm not digging around in the water.

3) The thermostats are very sensitive so I have better control over the exact temperature.

4) Cost versus the roasters sold as stone heaters. I paid $50 combine for both of my skillets as compared to the high costs of "professional" heaters, which are no more than roasters with different covers and much higher prices.

I've been using the same set of skillets for over 2 yrs now and they are still going strong. I also have the same roaster (the one from Walmart that's under $20) that was mentioned above which I use for heating towels to use during scrubs and wraps. I think it works great too!

You might want to wait until after you've taken the seminar to see what they are recommending that you use. Different styles of stone massage might work better using different equipment.

Angie
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Postby melb on Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:54 pm

moogie303 wrote:I use two skillets and I have NEVER had a client comment that they thought it was somehow unprofessional. I have had a few say something like "oh, are you making me lunch too?" to which I reply "yes, we're having Stone Soup."
I wouldn't expect anyone to comment "oh how unprofessional", but you're making them think of kitchen, food (the comments you have received indicate that) not hot stone massage. I'm sure if you used a Barbie bed cover on your massage table, no-one would actually comment how unprofessional it was, but a few would make a comment about dolls, and a lot of them would be thinking "how odd". The more you can keep a massage/spa environment away from images relating to kitchen/food/motor cars/Barbie/unrelated areas of life the better, IMHO.

moogie303 wrote:The benefit with the skillets is:>>>>>>
2) The depth is just enough to cover the stones without having so much water that you have to dig around for them. Also by using a skillet I don't have to deal with wearing those awful rubber gloves since I'm not digging around in the water.
I don't use skillets, I don't dig around looking for stones, and I don't wear rubber gloves to retrieve stones (I actually use a commercial kitchen bain marie with 6 inch deep pans, they don't have roasters in Australia and it was the closest thing LaStone could find out here when I did the training - even then they were saying "don't use frypans"

I don't think you would fit the full set of stones used in a LaStone session in a couple of skillets anyway.

When I just want a few stones heated up, I use a paraffin heater, doesn't look like something out of a kitchen and paraffin needs to be heated up to the same temp as stones, so not much adjustment is required, and it has a very sensitive temperature control. A Paraffin heater isn't enough to cope with heating stones up very quickly when they are returned to the heater, but it is only 150W - some of the other units use a lot more electricity.
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Postby moogie on Tue Feb 21, 2006 8:35 pm

The vast majority of my hot stone clients are repeat customers. They come back on a regular basis, so no, I don't think they believe I'm unprofessional for using electric skillets. Really, I don't think they care one way or another how I warm the stones instead they care about the quality of the massage.

As to how many stones I can heat up, I use 78 stones (from toe size to "anchor stones" which are about 5lbs each) for my standard routine. I heat the layout stones that I need when the client is supine first and after placing them I put the stones for "round 2" in to warm up.

Many therapists (including a great many on this board) use "kitchen" appliances including roasters, electric skillets, rice steamers and crock pots to heat their stones, towels and other various tools. I guess that makes us all "unprofessional?"

And besides.....they're not Barbie sheets, they're Strawberry Shortcake and Care Bear sheets.

:smt109
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Postby terab on Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:04 pm

angie, you're hilarious!

i actually use a roaster and i totally hate it. in fact, i quit doing hot stone massage because it's too much of a pain in the rear. after reading your post, i think maybe i'll try the skillet idea. when i originally looked at what to use, i saw the skillet but wasn't sure it would work so i didn't get it. glad to see your posts ~ i think i'll give it another shot!

ps. if you spray a light strawberry scent on those sheets, it gives it an extra-special touch i think your clients might really enjoy! :lol: have fun!!!
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Postby SalemRose on Wed Feb 22, 2006 6:17 am

Hey there gang!
Well, I never took a formal stone seminar so I just started to use what we have at work. One large stone roaster and one small stone roaster. Both are STONE roasters, did I mention that! LOL But the 18 qt roaster I got from WalMart is the same darn thing. I think people know what a roaster looks like even if it has a THStone lable on it. When clients ask me about stone massage I usually say "We heat basalt stones in a roaster or crock pot...." and they say "Wow! Really! I'd like to try that!"

The kitchen, IMHO, is quite the therapuetic place! Homemade beauty, health and wellness products have all come from the kitchen. So if someone sees that I use a GE roaster I don't think it's unprofessional. It's what works for me. Buying kitchen items and using them in my practice allows me to keep my costs down and rates reasonable while still making a profit. I'm sure clients think that is professional! Also, keep in mind that there are plenty of black and chrome products available to use. Not all roasters or skillets come with flowers painted on them. I also don't think you can compare store bought roasters and skillets to kiddie sheets.

Steph!
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Postby moogie on Wed Feb 22, 2006 7:20 am

Well, different strokes for different folks is what I always say!

What you use to heat your stones will largely be decided by what method of stone massage you are doing and what setting you are working at. I took my seminar from the folks at www.healingstonemassage.com and they teach you to use the skillets. They are also the ones in the Stone Massge DVD that is put out by RealBodywork. The people at La Stone teach it differently and I'm sure that there are many different methods/techniques out there.

That's why I suggested that she wait until after the seminar to decide what to buy to heat the stones with.

If I worked at a high-end spa, then I guess maybe the clients would turn their nose up at stones heated in an electric skillet, but I work in a moderately priced massage clinic where most of our clients are just everyday people......teachers, nurses, ect........ They're not there to be impressed, they're there for an affordable massage. That's what we provide.

And for the record my roaster is a plain white enamel and my skillets are plain biege enamel. No flowers in sight.

:wink:

And also for the record, many high-priced spa treatments do bring up food/kitchen in their very name. How about the chocolate wraps at the Hershey spa?? There is a famous Dallas spa that offers a BBQ wrap as their signature treatment. Then there are a plethora of treatments that have milk, honey, cucumber, ect, ect, ect..........

What works for you, works for you.

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Postby sagetherapist on Wed Feb 22, 2006 8:09 am

I used to have an 18 qt roaster to heat my stones. It broke (we had electrical problems at the shop & it 'fried itself' :? ). I bought an electric skillet to replace it from Target. Using that electric skillet cut down on my prep time considerably. The electric skillets fit all the stones I need, and heat them in about 10 minutes. The temp dial is very articulate. It's stainless steel finish with a clear & black lid. It looks gorgeous compared to the beheamoth roaster I used to have. (If you call me unprofessional, I'll laugh you all the way through my unprofessionally-three-weeks-in-advanced booking schedule.)

I now never even use my skillet or basalt stones.

I use my Wullstone Bong Mu Shon unit. It is superior science and technology. It is easier to clean between clients & can be turned on when the client is disrobing; ready when I enter the room. Talk about spontanaeity (sp?)!

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Postby melb on Wed Feb 22, 2006 5:08 pm

melb wrote: www.healingstonemassage.com do recommend using skillets.

moogie303 wrote:I took my seminar from the folks at www.healingstonemassage.com and they teach you to use the skillets.


That needed to be repeated?

I've done the training with LaStone and they don't recommend skillets. There are many other reputuable stone trainings out there that don't recommend skillets - Bruce Baltz for a start (which I think is the best hot stone video I've ever seen www.dtsm.net best investment I've made in stone massage other than my original LaStone training), and www.sacredstonehealing.com don't recommend skillets. The skillet issue was the main difference between www.healingstonemassage.com Carollanne Crichton when they started compared to www.sacredstonemassage.com (both have an Ayurvedic slant) - "you don't need to use a stone heater, you can just use what you have available", the stone massage is easy to set up line.

The original poster clearly stated they are going to do LaStone training, and skillets aren't the recommended heating method from LaStone, which I said originally, also mentioning who did recommend using skillets.

I shouldn't have used "food" as an example, I should've used "preparing food for a meal". Funnily enough no one is defending their rights to have posters of hot-rods with naked girls draped on the car in their treatment room, which was the other non-treatment example I used with Barbie and food

I really can't understand why so many are all going on about "I am not unprofessional" because I said skillets project a less professional image than a stone heater. Why a comment on image has everyone blustering as if it was a personal attack on an individual's professionalism and has brought out all these insecurities has got me puzzled.
I don't dress up with full makeup like workers at some spas are required to wear, I know that the grooming part of my image looks mighty unprofessional compared to those workers, but it is no reflection on my skills. (I'm actually booked up 5 weeks in advance at the moment, first weekend appointment I have available is April and it's a bit of a problem because new enquiries just won't wait that long)
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Postby SalemRose on Wed Feb 22, 2006 5:24 pm

Wow, I think this is going way personal folks. Maybe it gets lost in the translation. I think we're all professional but we're all different. Some of us swear by skillets, some of us by roasters. Some have never seen skillets be used! Okay, that's just me! Heck, I haven't even taken a formal stone class! LOL I think everyone just wants Kathryn to be aware of all the options so that she can take what she learns and make it work for her.

Steph!
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Postby Bodymovers on Sun Feb 26, 2006 4:43 pm

As I'm working with limited space, I use a crockpot. Most of my clients never see it. Some ask how I heat the stones, most do not. I tried the roaster that came with my set. It heats the whole room to almost an unbearable temp. I say go with what works for you personally. If IM on the table, all I want is a good massage!! (soup would be nice, too lol)
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Postby HolisticMT on Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:18 pm

I use a roaster or crock pot.
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Postby jyoti on Sun Mar 26, 2006 6:38 pm

Hi all :)

I'm fixing to order a warmer for my hot stone massage. I needed a biggin', one that could fit enough stones for a full body massage. I also REALLY wanted one that operated well at 120-130 degrees, as that's the ideal for tissue therapy without tissue damage. And it was really important that the display TOLD me the temperatures, versus just having a continuum that didn't tell you which temperature (even approximate) that you're currently operating at. And last but not least, I didn't want nonstick. All my utensils are old-school, and that means metal. I don't see a reason to have nonstick stuff (that will eventually "un-stick" itself anyway) when all you're doing is using stones (that will also probably end up scratching/nicking the surface.)
So after poking around on eBay, I came across a listing by this company, and followed this link
http://www.massageking.com/products/Sto ... r-(Roaster)-18-QT/2054/1/1

Do any of y'all use this? Of those of you who have, how did you like it? How did it hold up? Pros & cons? Any input is greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
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Postby superspagirl on Mon Mar 27, 2006 3:25 pm

jyoti your link will not work for me. Please check it and try to post it again. :)
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Postby melb on Mon Mar 27, 2006 4:24 pm

Long links often get broken (due to not BBCode friendly characters or line wrapping usually), you can copy and paste the full Url into your browser and it will work.

Long links can be entered using some BBCode, most people don't bother, but with the heater URL, BBCode doesn't cope with it anyway because of the brackets in it (poorly constructed URL), so it is cut and paste the url, or navigate around http://www.massageking.com/ using the menu on the left under Spa & Salon to Stone Therapy and check out the 18qt heater
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Postby moogie on Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:20 pm

I thought that "stone" heater looked familiar.
:wink:
If you enlarge the picture you can see that it is actually a GE "kitchen" roaster.

Which is what I use and I bought at Walmart for under $30. For what it's worth, I love mine. But if it's what you want to use, save some money and buy it somewhere else.

Just my opinion,
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Postby jyoti on Mon Mar 27, 2006 7:59 pm

Oh my gosh, I SAW that, moogie! <laughs> I can't believe it's going on eBay for like 80 bucks total...$40 for the unit itself, and then a full $40 extra for shipping?!?!?! :shock: Two words: In. Sane. And MassageKing doesn't seem to be a whole lot better, with the unit going for $50 and shipping is an extra $10. I detest Wal-Mart, but it really looks like I'd save a whack of money by getting this there! I looked online, believe me! No one's selling it for a better deal, not even the GE website themselves...they call it a Wal-Mart exclusive. <shrug> whaddaya do?

But I digress....anyway, thanks, moog! I'll be making the trip, probably tonite :)

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Postby Twylight on Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:27 pm

Hmm...guess I super lucked out. I found an old roaster that looked like it came out of the 50's or something. Grey insert and white exterior. Sucker heats up like she's new off the shelf. If I'm not careful and go over that 175 mark, we're talking definite HOT stones. I absolutely love it and wouldn't trade it for the newer streamline looking things. Guess what I paid for it? Nada...some nice old lady at a yard sale just gave me the thing. Guess that saying of when you need it most it shows up in your path ain't just whistlin' dixie. Had the same luck with my custom craftworks table...found it at yard sale, only been used twice. Had bolster, bag and warranty with it...$130.00. Love it when the massage gods play nice!!! :smt051
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Re: Bruce Baltz Hot Stone DVD's

Postby pueppi on Thu Apr 09, 2015 6:11 pm

melb wrote: ...Bruce Baltz for a start (which I think is the best hot stone video I've ever seen http://www.dtsm.net best investment I've made in stone massage other than my original LaStone training)...


Hi. Old thread, new question:

On the Bruce Baltz videos... of these two can you let me know which one were you recommending, melb?

  • Deep Tissue Healing: The Art of Stone Massage by Bruce Baltz
      "(80 min):
      •Learn 3 primary ways to pin a stone to the body.
      •Learn the importance of working with both hot and cold stones in a deep tissue format.
      •Learn to identify stones for specific areas of the body with using proper pace and pressure during application.
      •Learn to work with temperature and pressure that best suits you and your client (working within your own ability.)
      •For those new to stone massage this video will give you insight into a new modality and a proven way to assist in your client's healing process."
  • Healing Temperatures: A Journey with Stones by Bruce Baltz
      (30 min):
      "We share with you on the importance of temperature exchange and the benefit of cool stones. This increased awareness of hot and cool stones helps tap into the emotional component that exists with all injuries. This gentle approach will allow your clients to take that journey within to heal themselves with the power of hydro therapy principles."

-=-=-=-=-
Updated information found:

melb wrote:A review of a Bruce Baltz video http://www.massagetoday.com/archives/2005/01/16.html recommended as something to get AFTER you have done some training. Finally got this - it is the best video I've seen on hot stone massage, but I will go along with the 'get it AFTER you've had some training' line. The subtleties that he is sharing won't sink in if you're trying to learn hot stone massage from this video (and it doesn't cover the basics anyway). Very, very, very informative. Buy it here http://www.dtsm.net/cgi-bin/1028/site.c ... 58769.1122 Lots of good info on his site, worth reading the articles.


In light of this other post I found and moved here as a quote, I am guessing the suggestion made is for the DVD "Deep Tissue Healing: The Art of Stone Massage". Here is the updated link for the article melb talked about http://www.massagetoday.com/mpacms/mt/a ... p?id=13149. :)

    " Deep Tissue Healing: The Art of Stone Massage
    By Bruce Baltz

    Stone massage as we know it today has gone through many changes as its popularity has grown from spa sessions to injury treatments. Today, massage therapists have many choices in stone work education, and there are almost as many stone work classes as there are modalities in massage, ranging from home study classes to several day workshops, from Reiki with stones to deep tissue.

    With therapists and businesses trying to keep up with the public's demands for stone massage, the industry has run into unacceptable legal setbacks.

    In my opinion, the blame cannot be put on any one party. Therapists must be held responsible for their actions as well as the businesses that offer any type of service. This means the providing parties need to seek proper knowledge so all necessary steps are taken to provide the best treatment possible. The two elements most stone workshops have in common are the use of heat and application of stones to the body through a drape or directly to the skin.

    For this work to be done within a safe range for the therapist and client, specific steps must be taken into consideration, including the ability of the therapist to handle a hot stone and a client's tolerance to heat.

    When taking a stone out of hot water, make sure the temperature of that stone is within your tolerance. If it is too hot, your ability to apply that stone with confidence, whether through a drape or directly on the skin, will be greatly hindered, and your client will feel your lack of confidence.

    Once you have a stone that you are confident you can handle, you must consider your client's tolerance for heat. Take all necessary precautions to assure your client will have the best treatment you can provide. If a hot stone is being placed on the body through a drape, it should be done through a towel, not a sheet - the sheet will often be too thin. It is essential that you check with your clients to see how the temperature feels to them.

    Some techniques require clients to lie on the stones. A client's chances of suffering a burn during this treatment are greater, but the technique can still be administered with proper training. I tell my clients that they are in control of the session, which includes determining temperature - hot or cold - and pressure. If you do not give your clients this permission, they might think to themselves: "You are the professional and I guess this is the way it should feel." We cannot afford to have this thought cross their minds.

    If your intention is to apply a stone directly to the skin, you need to make sure the heat stays within the client's tolerance. If the maximum level is 10 and we do not want to be there, we are looking for the seven to eight ranges for deep-tissue work. You will also have to acknowledge that the seven to eight range could be different on each of your clients, with hot, cold, and pressure; this must be respected. The chances for injury to the client are greatly reduced when a properly trained therapist takes these steps.

    Day Spas, Resorts and Medical Offices

    To add stone massage as a modality to assist in the healing process you need to be aware of the learning curve to apply this technique safely. When therapists come to me for training in the use of hot and cold stones, I ask them to take a stone in their hands and work with it as though it is a part of their hand. It does not matter how long one has been a therapist, the stone will be an equalizer in class because student therapists have to massage with that stone as though it is an extension of their hand.

    This process will take time before the stone can be one with the therapist's hand. Therapists will need time to adapt the stone into the flow of their work. When this time is not taken, therapists will not develop the technique properly. Thus, the therapist will not feel comfortable, and the client will pick up on this feeling and not want the treatment again. This will reflect on all stone massage therapists, which will perpetuate a negative feeling for stone massage.

    I do not recommend that one therapist attend any workshop, and return to their place of business and train the rest of the staff in what they have learned. This could be a formula for disaster for the client, therapist and owner, and could result in an injury to the client, as well as legal action. Thank you to the businesses that support continuing education for their massage therapists, but allow your therapists the time to perfect their modality whatever it may be. The end result will benefit all involved."
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
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Re: heating massage stones

Postby pueppi on Thu Sep 10, 2015 5:33 pm

Cross thread with my description of my experience with Bruce Baltz's and a few other hot stone DVD's: viewtopic.php?f=23&t=10406&start=25#p239761

pueppi wrote:I had taken some time to research the recommendations for hot stone DVD's on our forum a while back and am just not getting a chance to sit down and do my comparisons. Today I finally watched it and compared it to some other hot stone DVD's I own (The Art of Nature's Healing Stone Therapy by Nature's Stones, Healing Stone Massage by Carollanne Crichton, The Art of Hot Stone Facials by Nature's Stones and The Art of Hot Stone Reflexology by Nature's Stones) while trying to decide what to keep and what to remove from my library. I bought Bruce Baltz's DVD on melb's recommendation and am very glad I did. :)

- Bruce Baltz's "Deep Tissue Healing: The Art of Stone Massage" (80 mins.) - I'm keeping. It gives an example of a good deeper hot stone massage, while not wasting a lot of time switching out more than a very useful amount of stones. There is no "layout" of stones, but he does put the stones into the client's hand, and "tuck" stones in various areas when they become "warm". He also has a nice technique where he pulls larger stones that stay hotter, at the same time he pulls his other stones from his Amber unit. This means he uses some of the smaller stones first, tucks the and then by the time he is ready for the larger stones, they have cooled to his liking. He also shows a nice technique for cooling down the neck stones if they are too hot, by working them on the upper arm prior to using them on the neck. / He uses the cold stones to cool the body temp back down and keeps those in a bowl of ice water before they are used.

- Nature's Stones "The Art of Nature's Healing Stone Therapy" (Old Version) ( 49 mins.) - I'm keeping. Although the actual stone massage is not necessarily to my personal preferences (very swedish in nature, light pressure and somewhat jerky), I think it is a better one to watch than the one on Carolanne Crichton's DVD (which is the otehr DVD I am comparing to). It covers contraindications, including "pace maker", and also shows a simplified version of "raindrop therapy" with Pure Pro oils at the beginning for the sequence {Layering: 1 "Courage", 2. Basil, 3. Wintergreen, 4. Marjoram, 5. Oregano, 6. Thyme, 7. Peppermint}. They show a layout that includes putting the stones on top of the sheet or towel, which I am more comfortable with (the Crichton DVD shows the hot stone placement directly on the client's body). They also show a nice hot pocket for the stones, that the therapist can wear. I also like that they use three stones that go between the fingers (and suggest not to use stones between the thumb and index finger, because the client may try to hold it instead of relaxing).

- Carollanne Chrichton's "Healing Stone Massage" (80 mins.) - I am selling. --- I don't like the style of her massage (it is very minimal and simply too light for my preferences) and most of the session is a "layout". She does use multiple temperatures which means she keeps two heaters going. The DVD gave some good basic contraindications. Some useful info on the DVD that I liked/picked up on: Green basalt stones keep heat the longest. Metamorphic stones retain heat for a long time. Cool (not iced) stones are good for lymphatic work. She uses two very large stones tucked into the trapezuis region. She uses very large and rounded stones for under than palms, while the client is supine. Place the stone when the client breathes in and remove when they breathe out (also mentioned by Bruce Baltz). The client can feel you working through the stone, so for the stomach stone you can rotate your fngertimps clockwise for the digestion and to deeply relax the client. You can also rotate the entire stomach stone a few monutes before lifting it off the client. When you remove the forehead stone, pull it into the hairline before taking it from the client. Use very large stones over the sole of the foot when the client is prone. And, I like that she places the toe stones from the smallest toe to the largest toe. I think they will probably insert between the toes easier and stay in place better, doing it this way.



Nature's Stones "The Art of Hot Stone Facials" (30 mins.) - I am selling. --- It tells you what you need to provide the facial and the kinds of stones you need. It shows a very minimal facial, but gives you an idea how to use stones, if you need that kind of information. I didn't find that it game me anything that I would use in practice at this point. But, I am not a facialist or esthetician. Oh, I did like the way they rolled the stones off the backs of the ear lobes when fidshing up from the neck, while holding teh fronts of teh earlobes with the palms.



-Nature's Stones "The Art of Hot Stone Reflexology" (30 mins.) - I am selling. --- It tells you what you need to provide the reflexology session and the kinds of stones that are most beneficial. They say Mexican Beach Pebbles in the basalt family and have a high percentage of iron and magnesium which makes them dense and allows them to hold a high amount of heat for a long time. Since you are using smaller flat stones about 2-3½" (which usually cause heat to dissipate quickly) these stones are useful. It looks like they only use a 4" flat triangular stone for the "zones" and a somewhat larger stones fr an overall massage on the foot at the end. I like the idea that they use a stone on the belly for the client and use a hand mitt which has a pouch/pocket inside of it to protect the clients hand from the hot hand/palm stone. The reflexology session is different than how I learned, so it is not something I will change over to. They do use oil for the stones, and do note that in a normal reflexology session lubricant is not normally used. They use one stone for each reflex bilaterally, and get a new hot stone when they start with a new reflex system (ie. 1 stone for bilateral Urinarry System, 1 stone for the Circulatory System, etc.)
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
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