Pricing for schools

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thespiritactor
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Pricing for schools

Post by thespiritactor » Mon Jan 18, 2010 1:09 pm

Hi,

I'm wondering if anyone can offer any advise on what might be a reasonable amount to pay for school. There's a few schools in my area and the price varies greatly. The lowest end of the spectrum seems to be about $7,000 after books, etc. The high end is about 20k. The school for 20k seems to be more extensive, thus covering a lot more modalities - which i find interesting - but that also seems like a very large chunk of money to get into debt for.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks much!

TheMasseur
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by TheMasseur » Mon Jan 18, 2010 1:18 pm

Texas School of Massage only charges about 5000 all said an done. Dr. Wray (owner) doesn't really care about making much off of teaching. He even works out a payment plan if you want to pay month to month. He's a pretty awesome guy and takes it upon himself to make sure you really get a good education. Most of the teachers are doctors and do a very good job of teaching their students about humany anatomy. I love it!

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JasonE
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by JasonE » Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:46 pm

In Minnesota I've seen shorter programs for about $5k, most/all of which have gone belly-up. No doubt more will pop up in the future.

The median price for a quality massage education in Minnesota is roughly $10-15k. I paid about $14k for my massage education and supplies. It was a certificate program, not a degree program.

Associates Degree programs are liberal arts degrees that include massage therapy training. I know of at least one such program that costs $30k. The actual hours spent on massage training are no more than any of the certificate programs, but you'd have your A.A. degree.

Some programs advertise that you will learn a ton of different modalities. Others offer a more thorough focus on limited modalities. Each approach has its pros and cons. As an employer, I generally prefer to hire MTs with great skill at a few things vs so-so skill at a bunch of things.

I often read resumes from new grads that list "certification" in 10-20 different modalities. I cross most of those items off because I know they only had maybe 10 hours of lymph drainage, 8 hours of reflexology, 6 hours of pregnancy, 2 hours of sports massage, 12 hours of cranio-sacral, 12 hours of myofascial release, 8 hours of zero point balancing, 2 hours of PNF stretching, etcetera... even as they were still struggling to master the basics of Swedish and some "deep tissue" techniques. It's great that they had some exposure to the concepts of these modalities... but they need to demonstrate strong core competencies before I will consider what else they may know.

In my experience as an employer, the most successful new MTs we've hired all came from schools that required a lot of documented practice hours outside of class, usually in addition to supervised practice clinics. Interestingly, we have also noticed that new grads who accumulated their experience at Massage Envy while in school have always been outperformed by those who accumulated their experience in a teaching clinic. My best guess is that the mentoring and guidance of experienced MTs in a teaching clinic is playing a critical role in the professional development of these students.

My best advice: Don't pick your school based only on price or location. Check to see if they are COMTA accredited, or at least by an accrediting body approved by the US Dept of Education. Pick schools that have high standards and require lots of practice outside of class, and preferably those who have a teaching clinic to work in. Talk to local massage therapy employers and learn what their standards are, which schools they most often hire from, and why. Choose based on quality and atmosphere, and you'll walk away with much more than a certificate/diploma.
Jason Erickson, NCTMB, ACE-CPT, AIS-TA
Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer
http://www.CSTMinnesota.com

Internet forums are like going to the zoo; if you get enough monkeys together, sooner or later someone will start throwing their poo.

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[email protected]
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by [email protected] » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:50 am

Jason is giving some great advice here! It's definitely more than just the price of school that makes all the difference. Go visit some schools in person, ask lots of questions, meet some instructors and some students. Talk to businesses in the area and find out where their Mts went to school. You will get a good feel for what schools are good in your area.
"The best pioneers are the ones actually out the doing massage. They get devotees just from having put their hands on them. That's what keeps the field alive and moving."
~Tiffany Fields

thespiritactor
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by thespiritactor » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:38 am

Thank you to everyone who took the time to reply to my post and Jason, a big thank you for your very detailed and thoughtful reply.

I really appreciated your perspective on the number of modalities and pricing. What you wrote, about being more qualified in few modalities then to have a broader but less qualified range of experience, this makes a lot of sense.

Pricing is not my first concern in and of itself - as long as i can feel comfortable the the prices i'm being quoted seem reasonable and standard in comparison to other quality school/educations.

The school that I'm considering the strongest at this time, Cortiva - does require their students to take part in school clinics - where the general public can get massages from students @ $30/pop. They also coordinate with other groups to provide volunteer opportunities for students (at places such as nursing homes and such). That is something that sounds like a great opportunity for both students and clients.

Another plus for Cortiva is that it is (and seems to be the only school in Washington that is) COMTA accredited.

Again - *lots* of great information - thank you!!!

pueppi
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by pueppi » Tue Feb 02, 2010 7:07 am

TheMasseur wrote:Texas School of Massage only charges about 5000 all said an done. Dr. Wray (owner) doesn't really care about making much off of teaching. He even works out a payment plan if you want to pay month to month. He's a pretty awesome guy and takes it upon himself to make sure you really get a good education. Most of the teachers are doctors and do a very good job of teaching their students about humany anatomy. I love it!
JasonE wrote:In Minnesota I've seen shorter programs for about $5k, most/all of which have gone belly-up. No doubt more will pop up in the future.
I can vouch for this school.

It is an excellent one and won't be going "belly up" any time soon. It's been around for years now and the owner is a colleague of mine who has the students best interest in mind. Hard to find. A gem to know.

However, I think part of the reason it can be a little less in Texas is because cost of living in general is somewhat less here than in other regions. Also, the basic course for an MT in Texas is 500 hours. So, some of the decreased cost factor may also in in the basic course hours being less than some other states.

I never assume that something is better just because it costs more. Many times this is true, but you still need to get the full picture.

Good luck in your endeavors.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

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JLWmassage
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Re: Pricing for schools

Post by JLWmassage » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:08 am

You also need to find out what courses they are going to teach. There is a school near me that offers a 1000 hr. program but as part of their program you need to take math, english, and science with other students that are not in the massage program and this program is $18,000 and you don't get a degree.

Massage school in my state are now 650 hr. & will cost about $15,000 with supplies. If you are not looking to get a degree in massage than I would suggest going to a massage school vs. a career school

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