Essential Somatics - Are you interested?

Discussion of topics relating to Continuing Education.

Moderator: moogie

Essential Somatics - Are you interested?

Postby pueppi on Tue Jan 06, 2015 1:22 pm

For the past year, I have been trying to pull together a group of interested bodyworkers, massage therapists, pilates teachers, yoga instructors, medical doctors, chiropractors and physical therapists for a Somatics Exercise Coach Training Level 1 (SEC Level 1) course in Houston, Texas.

It has taken some time, but I believe I have finally located a Physical Therapist who is interested in hosting the course and has a large enough space, just outside of north Houston. So, I am waiting to see what transpires. Houston is a central hub for Texas and the space is within a decent distance of the George Bush Intercontinental Airport (moniker for plane tickets = IAH).

If you are even remotely interested in attending a 3 day workshop in the Houston area, would you please be kind enough to drop me a line on this thread, so that I can get a feel for the interest?

See PDF Training Prospectus here: http://essentialsomatics.com/uploads/SE ... _21_13.pdf

Thanks in advance. :)
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State

HOUSTON, TEXAS - Essential Somatics

Postby pueppi on Wed Aug 12, 2015 8:27 am

We've got a date and a new host! The class will be offered at PilatesHouston which is a little west of downtown.

Martha Peterson, CHSE plans to offer a 3-day Essential Somatics, Hanna Somatic Exercise Coach Training course in Houston, Texas - May 13-15, 2016.

This should be an exciting course!

Please familiarize yourself with the Prerequisites -
Prerequisites:

Each student is required to have read Move Without Pain by Martha Peterson, and Somatics, Reawakening the Mind’s Control of Movement, Flexibility and Health, by Thomas Hanna, Ph.D.

Each student is also required to be familiar with the basic Somatic Exercises, as outlined in the book, Somatics, by Thomas Hanna, Ph.D. One can learn the basic Somatic Exercises several ways:

•learn the exercises from Martha Peterson's "Pain Relief Through Movement" DVD
•learn the exercises from Martha Peterson's book, Move Without Pain
•learn the exercises by listening to the "Myth of Aging" audio CD by Thomas Hanna
•learn the exercises from Lawrence Gold's "Cat Stretch" CD

A group teaching test will take place on the third day of the training. In order to receive a Certificate of Completion each student will need to demonstrate competence in somatic movement coaching.


PROGRAM DETAILS

In this comprehensive 3-day course students will attain a fundamental grasp of the most important core principles of Hanna Somatics that distinguishes this work from everything else. You will learn the science, philosophy, techniques in addition to learning to skillfully instruct ten basic Somatic Exercises and incorporate them into your primary practice. It is an excellent introduction to this highly effective, yet simple, and safe method of neuromuscular movement education and pain relief. In this intensive 3-day training you will learn:

•the basic neurophysiology and anatomy as it pertains to the teaching of Hanna Somatic Exercises.
•what Sensory Motor Amnesia is, how it develops in the brain and how Somatic Exercises, with consistent practice, can reverse it.
•how to recognize and assess the three full body “somatic stress reflexes” in your students in order to tailor your instructions to their needs.
•the technique of pandiculation as it pertains to the teaching of Somatic Exercises.
•the characteristics and language of Somatic Movement coaching as distinct from "exercise" programs.
•how to effectively teach the 10 most basic Somatic Exercises needed for quick relief of many muscle pain conditions.

Students will receive a detailed student manual and audio practice CD. Please bring a pen, extra paper if desired, water and your own personal yoga mat.

Class hours run from 9:30am - 6:00pm - Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

See Training Prospectus here: http://essentialsomatics.com/uploads/SE ... _21_13.pdf

May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State

Re: Essential Somatics - Are you interested?

Postby pueppi on Mon Aug 24, 2015 12:44 pm

Here are two threads with some weightlifters discussing Martha Peterson's work. It may be useful, if you are trying to get a feel of if this work will help you and/or your practice and how some other people feel about it. Plus, I wanted to save this info for myself and this is the best place to park it. :)


    colin k bell wrote:I have Martha`s Peterson Essential Somatics Dvd. As an olympic lifter, should i be using somatics only to maintain flexibility? Or should i use it in conjuction with regular stretching? I dont want to lose the flexibilty i have.

    chrisl wrote:One thing I would recommend is a weekend doing somatics, no driving or desk sitting or chairs. Just bed and floor. Get some somatics cds/dvds and do a couple of hours in morning and same afternoon. You will be surprised its by removing things that improves you, sure you may have to go back to driving/sport/desks/chair s but its a good retreat. Its cheap and will do no harm.

    blkjss wrote:I'm just a Regular Joe. I do this and Pavel's stretchings.

    Warren D wrote:I'd say it depends on how consistent you are with your Somatics practice. When I let it slide, I find myself benefitting from correctives such as a hip external rotator stretch before lifting, a kettlebell armbar here and there. When my practice is consistent I don't feel the need for any of it.

    colin k bell wrote:I am prepared to do any daily routine from the Martha Peterson CD- every day. Also thinking of ordering the other DVDs she now has.

    chrisl wrote:Hello, If you are consistant with the somatics and it provides a ROM consistant with the requirements such as your daily life and sport require then you wont need to stretch. Some sports or activities require ranges of motion out of the norm (gymnastics/martial arts) and stretching is required here to overcome the barriers set by tissues (ligaments) and stretch reflexes.

    Warren D wrote:I would say implement the basic one for a month first - you may not need more. But the other DVDs have some great movements that helped me.

    Be sure to test and retest - I evaluate pain (during/immediately after rep, after training session, before sleep), depth on snatch receive position, and "smoothness" of snatches, cleans and squats. These are qualitative.

    bryce wrote:Warren- Have you tried the DVD for athletes? I've been thinking about buying that one for a while.

    Warren D wrote: I do on a need-to basis. ... I've got the athlete DVD. By far and away the most useful movements on it are the invert/evert and psoas release. Very useful for those who go heavy on squats regularly.

    I hope to be a lot more useful to you all than just an advocate from January. I'll be taking Martha's Somatic Exercise Coach course as the first step of my path to clinical practitioner.

    colin k bell wrote:Awesome Warren!All the best with that and all your training.I will order that dvd.
    I have dropped all my self myofascial work and never felt better! Thats a climb-down for me as i was a fanatical myofasical release up until very recently.

    Warren D wrote:I wouldn't say my SMR was wasted time - it was better than nothing. I now view it as a quick fix for symptoms around training time if the environment doesn't favour relaxation.

    Jon G. wrote:I own the basic DVD, Athlete, Hip/Leg and Neck/Shoulders. I highly recommend all of them. Obviously, there is some overlap but some unique movements on all of them. I like to mix things up depending on my daily needs.

    colin k bell wrote:Do you do Somatics before your training? Or how would you recommend fitting Somatics in to the weekly schedule?

    Jon G. wrote:Before and after training. I usually work on some of the movements for at least 5 minutes, up to 15-20 prior. Post-training I work on whatever I feel needs a little tune-up for a few minutes. Sometimes it's as quick as "reaching for the top shelf" a few times and/or side bends... other times it's back on the ground for a few more movements. Have fun with it and mix it in where you can... even during training.

    Warren D wrote:I've been advised that "more is better" when it comes to Somatics. That is, one daily practice of 60min trumps two practices of 30min. The durations here are just an example of the concept. I've found this to be true, although getting any consistent time at all is a massive thumbs up.

    chrisl wrote:As Warren mentioned I would advise doing somatics movements at the start of day and a few movements at end of day.

    Most training environments require you to be ready and alert whereas the movements you need to be aware and relaxed, these movements are experiential unlike a stretch which people just throw in before a workout.

    Its about doing less not more, having less muscle tension by doing less rather than pulling the muscle or massage or foam roller.

    Oh and training environments ie gym floors may not be conducive to rolling around on.

    Warren D wrote:This really highlights the difference between stretching. It's brain (re)training that gets you the muscular benefit, and requires mindfulness.

    Warren D wrote:One area of interest I've had in the past is is "kind-of" pairing groups of Somatic movements with weight training. Pretty much every heavy weight training movement involves bracing the middle, for example a heavy squat or deadlift. Ribs and breathing pattern take a beating from general lifting. This means you always need the basics - arch and flatten/curl, back lift, side bend, washrag. For squatting, I like to add invert/evert into my practice for that day, as I'm prone to tightening around the adductors. ...

    In reality, a SomWOD would be pretty repetitive as the the basics should always come first. I've tried skipping straight to complex movements and it just doesn't work. The middle is always involved, so we start from the centre and work outwards.

    chrisl wrote:Unless you have a specific injury, or habituated movement pattern most people would benefit from the cat stretch. Sure you can do other stuff but do you need it? Find the minimum effective dose that gives you pain free movement for daily life and your sport.

    Feldenkrais lessons and movement lessons in general can be exploratory which is fine if that is your want and have time, but HSE was about freedom, not chaining yourself to a teacher or a third party giving out exercises. Tom Hanna selected the basic movements for your human being to benefit from, learn them and off you go, just like learning to brush teeth or tie your shoe laces.

    Warren D wrote:The first thing I noticed after starting these movements is how much better my intercostals felt at rest, in particular lying down. I dug around and found the residual soreness was gone, probably because they were no longer always on smash.




    Colin Bell wrote:Just wondering has anyone here tried any of these 3 therapies? (Feldenkreis,Somatics or Z-Health?) Im trying to decide on one of these to help with general mobility and also proprioception to help my lifting.Or maybe i should try a few?

    warren wrote:I've tried Z-Health and Somatics. Z-Health was okay but I found Scott Sonnon's Intu-Flow was better (and free). I first read about Somatics on Dan John's blog (http://danjohn.net/2011/05/martha-petersons-new-dvd/), and later on Weightlifting Epiphanies (http://weightliftingepiphanies.blogspot ... eview.html). I bought one of the Somatics DVDs and the results were very good for my lifting. So much so, that I later studied to become a teacher of the basic movements.

    Colin Bell wrote:I have the Martha Peterson DVD Pain Relief Through Movement DVD and CD pack, but confess i havent used it much. Would you mind sharing about your experiences and advice with Somatics please?

    warren wrote:My first real experience with Somatics was hosting Martha for a weekend seminar in London. I think we clock 5-6 hours of movement practice per day! That was exhausting, plus Martha also worked hands-on with my left shoulder.

    At the end of the weekend, I'd never felt so good. Every movement felt smooth and controlled. When I went to lift that week my depth and positions improved noticeably, and all those little niggly pains cleared up (especially my knees when squatting). Later that week I hit an easy equal PB, and a much more experienced lifter remarked on how effortless it looked. I felt confident in all my movement.

    I wanted to test the impact, so after the seminar I stopped doing all Somatic movements. Within 2 weeks I went back to "normal" and the aches crept back in. Lifting was affected and I definitely missed more. I spoke to Martha about it and she explained to me that stress reflexes are always going to be triggered in daily life - it's unavoidable. If you were to look at my posture after lifting, you'd see a big lordosis and that lines up well with what you'd expect with frequent squatting. However, the movements I learned were an easy way to reset back to something resembling a normal human. I think most people on this board know that getting a spine closer to neutral under load reduces injury risk and allows more weight to be handled.

    My advice, taken from Somatics educator Chris Lowndes, would be to use your DVD to create a "virtual seminar" in your home.

    Spend the weekend running through the DVD over and over, racking up 4-6 hours per day total. No sitting on chairs - standing, sitting or lying on the floor is fine though. Compare before and after postural photos of your front, back, left and right sides. Notice how well you sleep, too.
    Now, go lift on Monday and see what happens. If Monday's not your lifting day, run through the DVD once per day until it's time to lift.
    From then on, block out half to a full hour per day for movement practice. It could be 15-30 minutes at the start and end of the day, or just one longer session. Again, this is hard to do because it's forming a new habit. There's plenty of material out there on how to form habits; most advocate starting small but I say get half hour in for two weeks or so. By now you won't need the DVD, so you could use the audio CD to jog you along. It takes less willpower than trying to remember a sequence.
    Later, it's about doing the bare minimum you need to stay in top form. It might be 5 minutes a day, it might be more. Depends on a lot of other factors like work stress too.

    Most people won't take this advice, because it's hard and boring, but for someone like me who loves weightlifting it's a very small sacrifice to make in return for the performance boost and not being in pain. I think those two are very much linked because when I'm in pain (especially around the hips or knees) my form goes down the toilet. This is about as complete a plan as I can recommend to someone starting out without a local tutor. If you do give it a go I'd love to hear about your experience.

    warren wrote:If I were to go after target markets, bodybuilders would certainly be on my list! In relation to posing - if your brain isn't able to control a muscle due to sensory motor amnesia, how can one tense it to its fullest on demand? Old time bodybuilders used to practice muscle control and this is documented frequently. In relation to training, sensory motor amnesia shows up as jumpy, jerky or shaky movement - that clunky feeling where the brain is skipping over a part of the movement. A bodybuilder has great interest in tension and control of their muscle under load, throughout the range of motion. I feel this is one audience that would benefit greatly from the application of Feldenkrais or Somatics.

    Colin Bell wrote:Another question - do you still stretch etc ?

    warren wrote:It's worthwhile expanding your movement library but if you're keen to get started soon trust that what you already have is enough. Variety helps though if you're planning to do a weekend's worth!

    I don't stretch any more because I've found the movements do a better job of resetting the resting muscle tension. I'm not saying stretching is bad, just that I've compared the results of both and wouldn't trade the results I've got through movement education for any amount of static stretching. I might as well open this can of worms early - you can safely ditch the foam roller too *ducks*

    While I think of it, I want to point out here the difference between movement practice and corrective exercise. It's common practice to bundle correctives in with your training. Movement practice is absolutely unsuited to a gym environment - you benefit more from a quiet space with as little distraction as possible. There are some empty bar correctives I like - lunges for the knees (as far forward as you can go with the front heel firmly planted), clean grip overhead squats, a couple of shoulder bits and pieces - but really I only resort to these as triage. The correctives are damage limitation for when I know I'm walking into the gym not moving well. This self-monitoring is a known outcome of Somatics practice, and comes especially in handy when warming up.

    warren wrote:My choice for new starters is the first DVD - Pain Relief Through Movement. The production is a bit rough around the edges but this has all the basics.

    I empathise with you on the lack of digital products - this is something I've mentioned to Martha for reducing the barrier to entry. The same can be said of many other wonderful audio resources from Thomas Hanna, such as The Myth of Ageing. The title sounds a bit corny but it's great movement instruction. The only options there are CD or cassette tape (jeez) by post.

    That said, the final say on medium lies with the content producers. The only way that will change is by contacting them to let them know you want their product in digital format. In the meantime, I am grateful the materials are there at all I view the postage costs/wait times as minor inconveniences.

    By the way, though I wholeheartedly recommend Martha's materials there's no financial incentive for myself. I think the work of Thomas Hanna is so beneficial and of tragically small renown, which is why I promote Somatics as hard as I push weightlifting. If there's one population that gains big from this education it's us lifters.

    Colin Bell wrote:Hi Warren. Can i push my luck with a few more queries please?
    1) How long should it take to notice results?( hidden agenda- i am battling with a posture-related low back injury right now)
    2) Can i do it alone , or do i need hands-on first? Cant find any in Ireland.
    3) Are there any UK sources for follow-along programs ( audio/visual).

    warren wrote:1) How long should it take to notice results?( hidden agenda- i am battling with a posture-related low back injury right now)

    If your injury is acute, I would say proceed with caution and never move into pain. Consider getting it checked out. You say it's posture related, which implies it's a chronic ache/pain rather than an acute injury. Would that be accurate?

    A definition for you - soma: a body as experienced from within. I cannot quantify your results or guess at timeframes because I do not inhabit your body. Also, I have no idea of the repeat stressors that may be acting on you. If you feel able, I recommend trying the weekend retreat idea, perhaps adding a before/after pain scale evaluation alongside the photos. What you have with you now may be enough... with the DVD in hand the only investment is time.

    My experience was near pain-free, inside a day. I felt decidedly excellent after two days. This was with more than four hours practice a day, however.

    2) Can i do it alone , or do i need hands-on first? Cant find any in Ireland.

    The aim of the practice is to become self-aware, then self-monitoring, so that you may become self-healing. Most benefit from hands-on tuition but it's not necessary. Here are some practitioners in the UK and Ireland:

    http://www.somatics.ie/
    http://www.alignsomatics.com/
    http://www.evergreenwellness.co.uk/

    They may be out of range, given that two are in England. You could also contact Martha for a couple of sessions delivered over Skype:

    http://www.essentialsomatics.com/index. ... o_session/

    Ultimately, the responsibility will fall to you to maintain yourself. The goal of any Somatic educator is to get you to self-sufficient as soon as possible. To be clear: hands-on tuition is beneficial but not necessary.

    3) Are there any UK sources for follow-along programs ( audio/visual).

    I believe there is an educator called Brian Ingle who is UK based and may offer products. I haven't viewed any of them.

Essential Somatics: A Review - Weightlifting Epiphanies - http://weightliftingepiphanies.blogspot ... eview.html
Some testimonials from Spain: http://www.somaticsgibraltar.com/#!testimonials/clqi
Last edited by pueppi on Tue Aug 25, 2015 6:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State

Re: Essential Somatics - Are you interested?

Postby Breathe on Tue Aug 25, 2015 9:50 am

Sounds fascinating.
User avatar
Breathe
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1989
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Oregon

Re: HOUSTON, TEXAS - Essential Somatics

Postby pueppi on Mon Jan 18, 2016 12:52 pm

pueppi wrote:We've got a date and a new host! The class will be offered at PilatesHouston which is a little west of downtown.

Martha Peterson, CHSE plans to offer a 3-day Essential Somatics, Hanna Somatic Exercise Coach Training course in Houston, Texas - May 13 - 15, 2016.


UPDATE! Please make note of the NEW DATES: May 20-22, 2016.

Massage therapists who are nationally certified receive 24 CEUs for this course from NCBTMB (US only).
Last edited by pueppi on Tue Jan 19, 2016 8:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State

Hanna Somatic Exercise Coach Lvl 1| HOUSTON | May 20-26, '16

Postby pueppi on Tue Jan 19, 2016 8:48 am

Below is the updated information, all in one place, in case you want to share it with anyone.


I hope you will join us for:

Essential Somatics® Hanna Somatic Exercise Coach Training Level One

( Massage therapists who are nationally certified receive 24 CEUs for this course from NCBTMB (US only) ).


This course predominantly draws candidates from medical and bodywork backgrounds, including chiropractic, physical therapy, osteopathy, massage therapy, and movement disciplines.

Others outside the medical, bodywork and movement professions are encouraged to apply.




Program Details

In this comprehensive 3-day course students will attain a fundamental grasp of the core principles of Hanna Somatics and Somatic Movement: the science, philosophy and techniques, in addition to learning to skillfully instruct eight basic Somatic Exercises and incorporate them into your primary practice. It is an excellent introduction to this highly effective, yet simple, and safe method of neuromuscular movement education and pain relief. In this intensive 3-day training you will learn:

    ◾The basic neurophysiology and anatomy as it pertains to the teaching of Somatic Exercises.
    ◾What Sensory Motor Amnesia is, how it develops in the brain and how Somatic Exercises, with consistent practice, can reverse it.
    ◾How to recognize and assess the three full body “somatic stress reflexes” in your students in order to tailor your instructions to their needs.
    ◾The technique of pandiculation as it pertains to the teaching of Somatic Exercises.
    ◾The characteristics and language of Somatic Movement coaching as distinct from "exercise" programs.
    ◾How to effectively teach the 10 most basic Somatic Exercises needed for quick relief of many muscle pain conditions.



The course is currently set for:

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 9:30am through Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 6:00pm.



Location:

PilatesHouston
4669 Southwest Freeway, Suite 850
Houston, TX 77027 USA



You can read more here (basic info) which will lead you to the course prospectus.

We'd like to see the class make. So, if you do have the opportunity to send Martha a note ahead of time, to let her know of your interest, it would be helpful in garnering a rough idea of the potential head-count. Otherwise, it may be re-scheduled for the Fall or at some other time in the future. I believe the course needs 12 people to fill it.

-=-

You must be prepared for the course and take the pre-requisites seriously. So, please read and practice ahead of time! You will be expected to participate.



Prerequisites

This is not an introductory course for those wanting to learn Hanna Somatic Exercises.

Students should already have a daily experiential practice of Somatic Exercises and be knowledgeable about Hanna Somatic Education and the basic exercises as outlined in the book, Somatics, by Thomas Hanna, Ph. D. Each student is required to have read Move Without Pain by Martha Peterson, and Somatics, Reawakening the Mind’s Control of Movement, Flexibility and Health, by Thomas Hanna, Ph.D.

A few more ways to learn about Somatic Exercises are:

    ◾participate in a Myth of Aging or Move Without Pain Fundamentals Immersion course and be taught by a skilled Somatic Educator.
    ◾learn the exercises from Martha Peterson's "Pain Relief Through Movement" DVD
    ◾learn the exercises from Martha Peterson's book, Move Without Pain
    ◾learn the exercises by listening to the "Myth of Aging" audio CD by Thomas Hanna

You may be required to demonstrate the ability to teach a series of somatic exercises at the end of the course.
-=-

Students will receive a detailed student manual and audio practice CD. Please bring a pen, extra paper if desired, water and your own personal yoga mat.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State

Re: HOUSTON, TEXAS - Essential Somatics

Postby pueppi on Thu Feb 16, 2017 9:19 am

pueppi wrote:We've got a date and a new host! The class will be offered at PilatesHouston which is a little west of downtown.

Martha Peterson, CHSE plans to offer a 3-day Essential Somatics, Hanna Somatic Exercise Coach Training course in Houston, Texas - May 13 - 15, 2016.



It's taken a few years, but this course has finally made:

UPDATE! Please make note of the NEW DATES and NEW LOCATION: February 17-19, 2017.

Massage therapists who are nationally certified receive 24 CEUs for this course from NCBTMB (US only).

HSEC Level 1 (Houston, TX)
Fri, Feb 17, 2017, 9:30am - Sun, Feb 19, 2017, 6:00pm

Sundance Yoga Studio
128 South Friendswood Drive, Friendswood, TX, 77546, United States
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells... Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC
User avatar
pueppi
Registered Member
 
Posts: 5853
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Texas / The Lone Star State


Return to CEU's

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron