Myopractic Seminars

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pueppi
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Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Sat Jun 30, 2012 7:27 am

Something I have been meaning to get back to looking at for a while now:
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Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:59 pm

Houston, Texas now has a Myopractic® Muscle Therapy Instructor, for anyone looking to fulfill their Texas state CEU requirements.

You may also want to find a teacher in one of these current (as of 03/17/14) locations:
  • - Findlay, Ohio
    - Central Pennsylania & Baltimore areas
    - Huntsville, Texas
This work*, founded by Robert Petteway, is similar to Rolfing and other Structural Integration work (and is a simplified approach to the original Rolfing concepts and principles), with the foundational training providing Pain-Free Deep Massage. The Structural & Functional Integration residential class can also be taken to eventually allow the practitioner to provide the Series of 10, or working independently as needed.

The method uses little or no oil and can be done on skin or through the clothes. They also encourage therapist/client interaction during treatment.

The technique basically focuses on three areas known as: "compression stretching", "clearing" and "separating". The compression stretching works to bring deep relaxation to the patient, as well as to relieve tension, spasms and other common muscular issues. Clearing allows the practitioner to slowly work one muscle area at a time with slow deeper movements. Separating is a technique generally used along muscular lines in specific direction to accomplish the task of loosening the area in another way. The work also combines passive motion, active motion and rocking at various depths.

Listed foundational classes (6 hour CEU's) are:
  • Feet and Lower Legs.
  • Quads, Hams & Adductors.
  • Hip and Back Pain.
  • Shoulder Injuries.
  • Carpal Tunnel (Hands and Arms).
  • Whiplash (Head and Neck).
*To my knowledge, this is not the same as the work as the similarly named entities below:
  • - Australian Myopractic which may have since been re-named "Musculoskeletal Therapy".
    - "Myopractics", which seems to be founded by Dr. William J. Huls (Osteopath).



03/18/14 - added details.
Last edited by pueppi on Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:05 am, edited 25 times in total.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Sun Mar 16, 2014 6:19 pm

I'm pleased to write that I took their 6 hour "Hip & Back Pain" CEU course this weekend, and was happy with the knowledge passed along by the instructor. We were also given an illustrated manual to keep.

Yes, this class is for advanced work, in that you should have a decent grasp of the muscular system. And, there is both side-lying and site specific work. However, it is not too complicated in a 6 hour chunk of time and a novice who would like to learn some good foundational work would do well with the classes, and likely not be overwhelmed. Like anything else, if you have an opportunity to practice regularly, this will help you to solidify the knowledge once you leave the classroom.

What I really liked was that it provided me with a number of new options to work (which were much much easier on my body) while still being similar to how I currently work (regarding goals & expectations for working though a problem and creating change) in my own practice. ie. I don't expect to loose any clients by applying bodywork in this fashion, and I expect to have the same results (and in some cases, better than) I currently have. Since my practice is therapeutic oriented, this keeps from rocking the boat too much in one or the other direction, which is good for me.

I was also surprised at how little pressure and how little effort I needed to apply with these techniques, while still being effective and efficient. Plus, the techniques are easy to use because they are applied with the therapists hands in a more relaxed postion.

Because of the slow movement of the work, it is also very calming to both the practioner and the therapist.

The side-lying work was exceptional for getting into the glute medius and hip rotators. Much better than anything I have done in the past.

I was also impressed at the effectivness it had at clearing out some nagging left lower back issues I have been carrying around for a month or so. At the beginning of the class I was moving, bending and switching from side to side in my chair, due to the discomfort (and sometimes pain) I was experiencing in my back. At the end of class, I was able to sit in the chair peacefully, without trying to navigate a "side" to get comfortable on, in any way, shape or fashion. *sa-weet* :)


All in all, it was a very worthwhile day and I am planning to continue to take a few more classes, even after I log in my CEU's for the year. :)
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by holley » Mon Mar 17, 2014 10:41 pm

I plan on returning to the mainland in May and be traveling around the country a bit. Hope I have the opportunity to trade massage and learn some things from you. Nice of you to share with us.
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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Mon Apr 14, 2014 8:33 am

pueppi wrote:This work*, founded by Robert Petteway, is similar to Rolfing and other Structural Integration work (and is a simplified approach to the original Rolfing concepts and principles), with the foundational training providing Pain-Free Deep Massage. The Structural & Functional Integration residential class can also be taken to eventually allow the practitioner to provide the Series of 10, or working independently as needed.
For historical purposes, my understanding is that Mr. Petteway studied Soma Neuromuscular Integration with Dr. Bill Williams and then simplifed the work from that education. {I would appreciate it, if there is someone reading who can give any extra information regarding this or correct any mis-information I may have provided, to add their input within this thread.}

Since I had not heard of "SOMA" before, I did a little internet searching and came up with the following:
  • (Soma Neuromuscular Integration was developed in 1977 by Bill Williams, PhD. of Psychology and an accomplished Rolfer® who studied directly with Ida Rolf. A lens of psychology expanded the approach beyond attention to the body’s physical structure and relationship to gravity. The added layer of acknowledging body, mind and spirit as an inseparable whole system supports the multidimensional human being and distinguishes this practice."

    "He was among the Institute's first practitioners to branch out, and, with Dr. Rolf's blessing and suggestion of the name SOMA, he developed his own school within the Structural Integration tradition."

    "The interpretation of spontaneous drawing is an integral part of the psychological component of the SOMA sessions. The drawing, done by the client before the first session and after the last session allows the client the visual input to see their internal view of the changes that occurred.

    This piece allows the client to see the change as drawn by them. The drawing gives the SOMA practitioner a great deal of information about the internal experience of the client. This information can be assistive in framing questions of support, in individualizing and structuring the session.

    Picture interpretation is a rich tool to bring foreground the interplay of information often kept repressed about somatic aliments either physically or psychologically. With awareness, these somatic fears can be confronted and ideally resolved."
    )


Since the Myopractic Foundational education is only 36 hours of work (and so far has not mentioned spontaneous drawing or discussed much of how much ofSI deals with the body in gravity, due to it's simplified nature), I think it can be useful for allowing a therapist to get a taste of Structural Integration for a limited cost factor, without becoming completely submersed in a full program. I've been through the 10 rolfing sessions and this work is similar, but not nearly as intense. Not having experienced SOMA, I cannot say if it is similar to that style of work or not. I also did not see the work listed in the IASI school guide (likely due to the decreased hours of study). I believe the IASI recommends a full 650 hours (or thereabouts) to become immersed in the work.

Because of this, someone who is interested in a deeper knowledge of Rolfing, Soma Neuromuscular Integration or other Structural Integration work, may wish to take a more involved education.

For a detailed list of IASI schools you can visit: 04/14/14: Edited to include IASI list.
Last edited by pueppi on Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:00 pm, edited 9 times in total.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:05 am

I took their 6 hour "Shoulder Injuries" CEU course this weekend which included an illustrated manual to keep.

The technique is a little difficult for me to pick up, but this is mainly because I am now required to learn how to work much lighter, and additionally move slower than I normally do. These are the two factors that are making the work difficult for me. I have however been practicing parts of it since the LB/Hip class in March. But, even when I think I have backed off in my pressure, my husband (who is also taking the course and also an MT) keeps telling me I am working at a rate of 200% deeper than the instructor. Owwww! :shocked: I was also informed that I need to apply more of the pads of my fingers in a number of techniques. I presume that part of my issue with still adding too much pressure is that I watch the instructor and the effort she is putting into the bodywork does not look proportionate to the "lighter" work. To explain it differently, her pressure is light, but when you watch her move it appears as though she is working harder than she is. I don't think it is for effect, but I do think it is confusing my visual understanding. She is about 17 years my senior with a different constitution than myself, and since we all are different, I believe that as I go through the coursework I will better be able to visually translate the discrepancies.

The one thing that has not been difficult for me is that I am already used to working an "area" of the body for an hour in many cases. So, if a client comes in with shoulder issues, I don't have a problem working the shoulder and related structures as that goes. If you are not used to working in this way, the concept may take a little while to grasp. So, what I would suggest, is that if you plan to take the course work, consider doing a little more "area specific" work, so that you are able to get a better mental picture of the change you are hoping to effect.

The actual content is not an issue if you have a fairly decent understanding of anatomy and/or are capable of learning material fairly quickly. If you have good anatomy skills but are a slow learner, you'll do fine (just repeat until you get it over the following weeks), or if you can cover broad swaths of material quickly, you'll still do fine (just go over your anatomy over the following weeks).

The instructor also suggested getting a music stand and placing it in your treatment room and letting your clients know that you are going over the specifics of some new work, and just flipping the pages as you go.

The information that was given to describe issues such as "frozen shoulder" was basic, and if you have your license they should not be overwhelming.

The anterior work covered pec major and pec minor, along with origin/insertion work, the lats, the teres, the subscap and the arms (including deltoid, biceps and triceps).

Side-lying work was very useful as it gave me another way to work into the rib-cage (I normally work anterior and posterior only). A nice tip was to ask the client to take in a deep breath before exhaling in order to find the intercostal spacing a bit easier. There was also a nice soft fist neck stretch, that I normally use when working with the client supine, and now see that I am able to use it with the client in the side lying position, perhaps a bit more effectively.

Posterior work allowed for a lot of "compression stretch" and "clearing", along with using sitting techniques on the stool at the head of the table with the client supine, in order to work the traps. I do this reguarly (the seated postion and use a stool similar to this), but with the covered thumb technique it makes working the traps even that much easier. I am quite enjoying the covered thumb technique.

Today, after the work received from class yesterday, I notice that my arms are nice and loose and even with all of the deep pec work, I am not sore. There is only a little sensitivity under the pec major when I poke around in there.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

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Re: Myopractic Seminars

Post by pueppi » Thu Nov 05, 2015 11:58 pm

pueppi wrote:Since the Myopractic Foundational education is only 36 hours of work (and so far has not mentioned spontaneous drawing or discussed much of how much of SI deals with the body in gravity, due to it's simplified nature), I think it can be useful for allowing a therapist to get a taste of Structural Integration for a limited cost factor, without becoming completely submersed in a full program. I've been through the 10 rolfing sessions and this work is similar, but not nearly as intense.
I ran across this a while back and wanted to add it somewhere for reference. The Myopractic website states how they proceed through the 10 sessions. I can't recall if this is the same as the Rolfing "recipe" or not, but it may be useful to someone in the future.
Structural integration sessions are designed to "unwrap" the body in a given order so that a natural function and anatomical alignment emerges. The ten sessions, combined with Myopractor anatomical balancing techniques, work to clear body/mind patterning, relieving chronic pain and improving quality of life. The ten session are:
  • Session 1 hips, lateral legs and chest.
  • Session 2 feet upward to the knees.
  • Session 3 lateral body line, ears to ankles.
  • Session 4 the hip, lateral and medial leg.
  • Session 5 the entire front line of the body.
  • Session 6 the entire back line of the body.
  • Session 7 the head, neck and arms.
  • Session 8 four sides of the lower body.
  • Session 9 four sides of the upper body.
  • Session 10 front and back lines.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

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