The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

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Wizard
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The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by Wizard » Thu Feb 14, 2013 2:28 pm

Hello there!

I'm new to this forum, and this will be my first topic. My question is basically written in the subject box, but I will clarify it here a little...

So, I started studying as a professional sport masseur about 1½ months ago. I really enjoy it, I'm finally studying what I feel is the right thing for me. Our school is good, the teacher: awesome. Duration: 1 year.

Now, this school is known for educating good masseurs, but also for students eventually going to study physiotherapy or osteopathy afterwards. I've read, heard and understood that those two professions are pretty detailed and academic and latin is very much needed. I've also understood, that a doctor might send a patients to visit a masseur, accompanied with description of sympton, where it is of course necessary for the masseur to understand the anatomical terms of latin. I can also imagine, that a masseur specialized in sport injuries will more likely encounter this situation, than a basic masseur.

But how much does a basic masseur really need the terminology? I've had plenty of great help from masseurs, who don't really know latin at all...or than have studied it after already done several years of efficient work...only so they could get the papers of being a professional to be more credible. Today...in our class...a guy who had the worst grade from our latin exam was my pair when we were practicing. Now I must say that from all the 35 people of our class, he was definetly the best till now, going with intuition and I was really impressed by his grasp.

I think learning latin is kinda fun, and I hope that after school, I won't forget the terminology...I'm not sure yet do I want to continue my education after this school to something where latin is really useful. Until now, I've been satisfied about my grades and will keep on doing hard work to memorize the human body in latin...but still this question roams my mind about how much I really will need the terminology, after I'm a professional and giving people treatment as a "basic masseur."

Still with me? :)
I'm thankful for all your comments, and I'm not afraid of critisicm, if my question and pondering is just plain stupid.

holley
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Carpe Diem or

Post by holley » Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:25 pm

"Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate".

Once latin was the language of the learned, seems an archaic practice with little relevancy except to linguists. I had two years of it.......
'Every Day is a god, each day a goddess and holiness pours forth in time."

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MarionFM
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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by MarionFM » Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:07 am

I believe that is Italian rather than Latin.

It is from Dante"s Divine Comedy: Abandon hope, all ye who enter here.

One reason to learn the Latin names for things is so there is less confusion. You would not be learning to speak or write Latin, just the terminology. If you have learned the names of many muscles already, you have already learned Latin.

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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by pueppi » Fri Feb 15, 2013 7:32 am

Could you let us know a little more about the class? It may help up to discuss the teaching better.

Are you learing "Latin", as in Latin I - which would work from a book such as "Wheelock’s Latin" and teach Grammar & Syntax? My husband had to take a Latin I course in his school last semester, and it was nothing like the "Latin" we were taught for medical terminology.
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Wizard
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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by Wizard » Sat Feb 16, 2013 1:34 am

pueppi wrote:Could you let us know a little more about the class? It may help up to discuss the teaching better.
Oh but of course! I just noticed I could practice being more clear, same thing I notice in class while asking questions. :D

I think I'm referring to what one calls the medical terminology...the parts of the bones, muscles..."os ulna, tuberositas deltoidea, musculus palmaris longus" etc...later we'll be learning terms of the nervous system. So no grammar and syntax.

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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by JasonE » Sun Feb 17, 2013 1:43 am

You aren't learning Latin. You're learning anatomical terminology. Those terms are used by anatomists and health care practitioners throughout the world, and give us a common terminology that is indispensable for communicating with them.

Learning the names is a part of learning to understand tissues, structures, and functional relationships. That knowledge will greatly enhance your chances of becoming an excellent MT. It's much easier to learn it now, while you are in school, than it would be to self-teach later.

Knowing the anatomy and the correct terminology for the anatomy will make it much easier for you to study the sciences that provide a scientific basis for studying and discussing massage therapy, pathology, physiology, etc. This is is something you should continue to study for as long as you practice, so the terminology will always be useful and relevant.

As massage therapy is slowly integrated into the practice of medicine, knowing proper medical terminology is essential for effective communication within medical venues and between different types of care providers. Again, what you are learning now will always be useful and relevant for as long as you practice.
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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by Wizard » Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:22 am

Thank you JasonE for this clarifying answer. That was something I wanted to hear.

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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by pueppi » Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:59 am

I absolutely agree with JasonE.

This is your profession, one that comes with anatomy, and therefore anatomical terminology. You will also find that in addition to making it easier to communicate with other people who work with the body, it will also be significant in writing your chart notes.

When you go back to a chart note you'll find that it is much more economical to write:
  • - petrissage to the left upper trap

    instead of

    - petrissage to the left shoulder between the neck and arm

Additionally, when I was in school, I found the best way to really get the anatomical terminology right was to take a picture of whatever part of the body you wanted to talk about and then, sit back to back with someone and describe the area. We also used to do this via telephone. It was a great exercise in getting the lingo down in a manner that someone else would know exactly what you were talking about.

This became even more important in my radiology classes (non-MT).

Knowing how and where to place the anatomical landmarks, as well as knowing at what point in the conversation to describe right - left - upper ⅓ - middle ⅓ - lower ⅓ - etc.

For example... If I say:
  • - There was a fracture of the upper ⅓ of the left tibia in 2003, due to a skiing accident. Resolved. No residual complaints.

    that is entirely different than

    - There was a fracture of the left upper ⅓ of the tibia in 2003, due to a skiing accident. Resolved. No residual complaints. ---> Now you will want to know which tibia we are discussing.

Hope this helps. :)
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

Wizard
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Re: The point of learning latin for a basic masseur?

Post by Wizard » Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:24 am

It does. Thank you!

This motivates me to study the anatomical terminology seriously.

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Considerations in learning anatomical terminology

Post by holley » Sun Feb 17, 2013 1:37 pm

'Every Day is a god, each day a goddess and holiness pours forth in time."

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