Documented Practice - 2 questions

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cfaye
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Documented Practice - 2 questions

Post by cfaye » Sat May 03, 2014 7:44 am

Hello!
I'm in my first month of massage school and we need to do 12 documented practices per semester. I've done 6 so far (we've only done Swedish massage of the legs, face, neck, & arms - next week we'll work on backs). The 6 that I've done thus far have been family or close friends. Our instructor would like us to branch out and massage as many people as possible instead of just sticking with family (for a variety of reasons). Here are my 2 questions:
#1. I'm not having difficulty finding interested people, friends of friends really. However, the follow through is an issue. Everyone says "wow, I could so use a massage". But when I say, "how about this weekend", there seems to be hesitation. One thing I did notice about myself is I leave things open-ended. So I've instead been saying, "I'm available these dates at these times". Any other suggestions getting "clients" to follow through with me?

#2. Where should I offer massage? I have a small home, but I'm more than happy to open it up to give massage. This makes things a bit easier since I can just "schedule" a few massages one right after another. However, I've only got one bathroom and we'd be in the living room. I assumed that because its just practice and I'm not charging that working out my house wouldn't be an issue, what do you all think? If I'm giving massage out of my home what things should I do to make it more professional feeling. Especially since I'm getting to the point that I might not necessarily know the person I'm practicing on, beforehand.
I think that added up to more than 2 questions :)
Thanks! :)

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pueppi
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Re: Documented Practice - 2 questions

Post by pueppi » Mon May 05, 2014 8:04 am

I'm not sure you can implement these, but here are a few ideas that may better help solidify your schedule :) :

1. I think the first thing is to know exactly where you plan to do your work. Since you mentioned working out of your home as being easiest, I think I'd keep it simple and offer appointments on specific days and time frames, for now. I would also stray away from letting people into your home that you do not already know, except by way of referral by a friend or family member. (see extra information below)

2. Next create some urgency. Tell your "clients" that you need to do a certain number of "face, neck, arm & leg" sessions by a particular date. Ask if they would be able to help you complete this task. Let them know how long the session will take. Have an appointment book and appointment cards to create a better result if necessary. {Note: if you order appointment cards from Vistaprint, they have recently changed all of their paper stocks. You'll now need to use their "Recycled Matte", as any other paper stock that has the term "matte" is not a true matte and your ink for the written appointment time/day will smear on the card.}

3. Last, let them know that you will need them to fill out a review of your work. The good, the bad and the ugly. And, come up with a short form that has check boxes and a few fill in the blanks, for them to fill out after the massage.

This will take some of the guess-work out of the situation for them, and allow them to actively participate in your education. Additionally, I think it will help to get them into your student clinic when it's time for your clinical work.


Extra Information

To create a more professional feeling in your home, you can do a few things::

Keep in mind, that these people may some day be future paying clients... so don't provide massage in 'jammie-pants', etc.
jyoti wrote:MAINTAIN BOUNDARIES.
Keep personal and business separate. If you practice from home, delineate a clear, devoted space and separate it from the rest of your living space.
Playing off of this, shoji screen room dividers are a great way to to lead the client to the therapy room, thereby keeping all other areas of the home off limits.

I know a reflexologist who uses this method along with a lighted path (those small press on lights) which she puts on the ground on either side of the path, every few steps. This provides the lighted path, as she keeps the other lights in the neighbooring rooms off (discouraging accidental roaming).

Do not provide a "tour" of your home.

For your door sign:
jyoti wrote:...taped up a notice on the front door something to the effect of "Welcome! If you're new here and you're here for a massage, you've come to the right place. If this door is closed, this means we're with another client or otherwise unavailable at this time. If this is your first visit, please wait until 10 mins prior to your appointment before approaching, and if you're an established client, please wait until 5 mins prior to your appt before approaching. This is to protect [client privacy]". ( --- [ ] = phrasing changed by pueppi)
jyoti wrote:Our house is laid out in such a way that the clients come through the front door and see only the front room (sort of a living/dining room but has our desks and a consultation/waiting-area table and chairs), and a hallway with the door to the treatment room at the end, and a client-only restroom on the way. They see NOTHING of our kitchen, living room, bedroom, laundry room, etc. In fact, the hallway to those rooms is sectioned off at the front with one of those Japanese-looking 3-panel room dividers.

<snip>

The main thing to concentrate on is the cleaning, at least of those areas the clients see. While everyone understands a house IS lived-in and not just a museum, it still has to be REALLY sanitary. Bleaching down the restroom weekly and vacuuming at least every other day is a must. As far as food smells, there's an easy way to deal with that. :) At one of the local craft outlet malls, they sell these scent lamps that you fill with a scent of your choice. The mixture is mostly alcohol and a little bit of fragrance oil, but the alcohol will burn off and leave only the fragrance wafting through your house. The neat thing is, it will sort of "soak up" or neutralize odors. We tested ours out after making pan-fried salmon with garlic for lunch. A friend of ours came over (who hates salmon) and we mentioned to her that we'd just had it and she said she couldn't smell it AT ALL.
jyoti wrote:
massagechick wrote:jyoti, do you carry 2 cell phones with you? One biz and one personal?
I do. :) Yes, it looks kinda geeky :) But it works!

We actually did it to simplify things, so that I didn't have strangers calling my personal cell phone and vice versa. For us, it was really more of a way to define our boundaries. And since we work out of our house, boundaries can get a little fuzzy as it is, and we have to be extra-mindful of establishing them. :)
jyoti wrote:We have both a house/street address and a PO box. Neither are on our cards. Our cards have our names, d/b/a, small logo, phone #, website, and a small listing of our main modalities. :)
Two other useful threads:

Earlybird clients - http://www.bodyworkonline.com/forum/vie ... 20&start=0

Working from home, but... - http://www.bodyworkonline.com/forum/vie ... 38&start=0
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Houston Massage Therapy - Advanced Massage Therapy - Lucas & Lucas, LLC

cfaye
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Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:49 am

Re: Documented Practice - 2 questions

Post by cfaye » Wed May 07, 2014 3:23 am

Thank you, thank you thank you! Those are some GREAT ideas!

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MTSI
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Re: Documented Practice - 2 questions

Post by MTSI » Sun Jul 27, 2014 1:34 pm

cfaye wrote:Hello!
I'm in my first month of massage school and we need to do 12 documented practices per semester. I've done 6 so far (we've only done Swedish massage of the legs, face, neck, & arms - next week we'll work on backs). The 6 that I've done thus far have been family or close friends. Our instructor would like us to branch out and massage as many people as possible instead of just sticking with family (for a variety of reasons). Here are my 2 questions:
#1. I'm not having difficulty finding interested people, friends of friends really. However, the follow through is an issue. Everyone says "wow, I could so use a massage". But when I say, "how about this weekend", there seems to be hesitation. One thing I did notice about myself is I leave things open-ended. So I've instead been saying, "I'm available these dates at these times". Any other suggestions getting "clients" to follow through with me?

#2. Where should I offer massage? I have a small home, but I'm more than happy to open it up to give massage. This makes things a bit easier since I can just "schedule" a few massages one right after another. However, I've only got one bathroom and we'd be in the living room. I assumed that because its just practice and I'm not charging that working out my house wouldn't be an issue, what do you all think? If I'm giving massage out of my home what things should I do to make it more professional feeling. Especially since I'm getting to the point that I might not necessarily know the person I'm practicing on, beforehand.
I think that added up to more than 2 questions :)
Thanks! :)
This is a tough one because it seems like you are seeking them rather than them seeking you. Any thoughts on starting a Facebook fan page or a blog that targets your local area? this ensures anyone looking for a massage can find you online. those folks that find you are generally more serious and will follow through. as for where to offer massage, there are pros and cons of offering it from home. you can join a massage center nearby and pay them rent, or offer it at home or at a client's home. try a variety until you get more experience. you will be able to better determine what environment suits you better over time the more you do it. maybe you will find that you like traveling to your clients' homes and providing them with convenient massage arrangements.
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