massaging the face

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johnnymac
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massaging the face

Post by johnnymac » Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:50 pm

I have had a couple of clients who don't want their face done, due to it causing wrinkles. :shock: .Could anyone give me some sound advice or or some documention that may make them change their minds. I guess my telling them they are off base isn't cutting it.

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Re: massaging the face

Post by maestra » Thu Jul 16, 2009 8:24 pm

Gee, and I just went Tuesday to have a facial specifically for the purpose of minimizing wrinkles and she did a little massage...

Somebody should have told me... :roll: :lol:

I enjoy giving a facial massage and I have never heard of it causing wrinkles.

I always thought a good facial massage helped to relieve stress which often makes you look Younger...:lol:
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Re: massaging the face

Post by Breathe » Thu Jul 16, 2009 9:57 pm

The cosmetologists and makeup professionals tell women not to apply their creams and foundations in downstrokes because that causes wrinkles. Of course, there's probably no basis whatsoever for such a claim, but when a woman has heard that for her entire life, it's not likely the massage therapist will change her mind. 8) (First time I heard this, (that I remember,) I was about 14 and attended a Jafra party with my mother and her friends. I was taught to apply moisturizer, foundation and who-knows-what-else, using only upward strokes in order to "minimize the development of fine lines, wrinkles and jowls." Seriously. At 14.

On a personal note, I do not like to have my face touched, regardless of whether or not it could cause wrinkles, so maybe the request could just be regarded as the woman not wanting anyone other than herself or her facial person touching her face?
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Re: massaging the face

Post by squash_blsm » Fri Jul 17, 2009 8:55 am

I am 50 yrs old and I also decline the facial massage from massage therapists.
I don't think it's their strong suit at all.
Many of them use far too much force and drag.
The sensation of having my delicate mature skin pulled all over the place DOES make me feel like the therapist is causing damage to my skin.
Massage cream - especially biotone -is not a product I want on my face.

Now - when I get a facial, the esthetician has a much better touch and they are trained in methods and techniques which not only feel good, have beneficial results.
'Sides, if I WANTED a facial massage I would have booked a facial - not bodywork.

There is nothing that you can tell or show them to change their minds.
I think that you should respect their wishes and leave 'em alone!
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Re: massaging the face

Post by pueppi » Fri Jul 17, 2009 9:16 am

I'd say only 1-2% of my clients get facial massage. Not that it's not a nice touch and all that jazz, but many of my clients are 'here and there' and going back to work, or have some other function/meeting to go to later that day/evening.

I am also careful to ask them if they have somewhere to be or someone to see after the massage. If so, I always do any of the prone (face-down) work first, in order to minimize the face cradle leaving a crease on their forehead or face.

Think of someone not wanting facial massage as a gift of extra time to put somewhere else.

And, to answer your question, I have never heard the comment about "wrinkles". I don't have a selling point for you, but maybe you could just do some google research on it (I'll also look--> on a day when I have time). Then if we find some documentation, you could type up the info and laminate it to keep for someone to read. Or, you could place it in your waiting area/room for clients to check out.

PS: If you come up with documentation before someone here does, please add the link to this thread! :)
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Re: massaging the face

Post by AnastasiaB » Sat Jul 18, 2009 6:13 pm

I like to have my face worked on, she says with a qualifyier - providing the lmt doing the work doesn't use a lot of "weight" [pressure] in her/his approach to touching my face. Also, NEVER use lotion/oil/cream on my face unless you ask if it's okay first... many allergies and sensitivities to said lubricants. In particular I like facial work for pain relief from a zygomatic frx near the medial aspect of my R eye and to help relieve tension in masseters and pterygoids from clenching my jaw when concentrating too hard.
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Re: massaging the face

Post by squash_blsm » Sun Jul 19, 2009 6:53 am

Anastasia needs cranio-sacral therapy :grin:
AnastasiaB wrote:I like to have my face worked on, she says with a qualifyier - providing the lmt doing the work doesn't use a lot of "weight" [pressure] in her/his approach to touching my face. Also, NEVER use lotion/oil/cream on my face unless you ask if it's okay first... many allergies and sensitivities to said lubricants. In particular I like facial work for pain relief from a zygomatic frx near the medial aspect of my R eye and to help relieve tension in masseters and pterygoids from clenching my jaw when concentrating too hard.
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Re: massaging the face

Post by AnastasiaB » Mon Jul 20, 2009 7:16 am

My lmts use craniosacral, even for my face. It's just that I like certain types of work on my face when massage is being done. Having had to suffer through a facial massage that was more like working the dents out of an auto body than a facial relaxation massage [despite LOUDLY stated dislike for the pressure being used] I have a definite idea of what does and doesn't feel good to my face. Heavy pressure and deep trigger point to my face HURT!! :shock: Moderate friction/kneading do not. OrthoBionomy techniques, myofascial work, and CST don't hurt either. My allergies and sensitivities limit the types of lotions/creams/oils I put on my own skin to maintain its moisture. No one else gets to put stuff on my face unless I permit it. Most of those folks in my practice whose faces I massage prefer not to have lotion/oil/cream put on their faces as well. The ladies state that they only want to use their own moisturizers etc on their faces - fellas say creams/lotions, etc are a bit to "girly" for their liking.

If I can see that a client has particularly dry skin and has "face" issues - tmj, sinus issues for example, I will use a hypoallergenic cream to moisturize my own hands a bit before I work on their faces, but, I add nothing to their skin itself. They are happy, their skin isn't abraded or roughed up by massage work, and the difficulty is addressed properly to the satisfaction of all concerned.,
Anastasia B

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Re: massaging the face

Post by pyronymph » Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:52 pm

I never really enjoyed giving facial massage, until I was required to do it as part of "the spa protocol." This is when I found out that it's actually one of my strong suites (after I was asked by the estheticians to teach them how to do it) and I now offer it regularly to my personal clients and rarely have it turned down.
I usually choose not to have my own face worked, unless I'm having issues with my TMJ... I just prefer not having that area of my personal space invaded, and I have found very few therapists who's touch I trust enough to allow it.

And I would NEVER allow someone to use massage oil/lotion on my face! Not only is it completely unnecessary, but the greasiness would drive me nuts! Massage oil/lotion is not the same as moisturizers/face creams, and could cause a lot of reactions on the sensitive skin of the face. It's not even recommended to use a body moisturizer for your face, b/c of pore blockages and oil production. I would not recommend using massage oil, which is specially formulated to take longer to be absorbed.

(ETA: this is not directed at anyone in particular... just wanted to clarify before any possible uproar could occur)
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Re: massaging the face

Post by melb » Mon Jul 20, 2009 8:59 pm

Best face routine I've ever learnt was the Ayurvedic Face Rejuvenation beautiful routine, very relaxing and very rejuvenating. very light, no skin stretching going on in that routine. I did the course and got the video - just watching the video relaxes me so much I don't think I've ever managed to watch it all in one go!

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Re: massaging the face

Post by JasonE » Mon Jul 20, 2009 9:16 pm

I work on a lot of faces, and usually include it in a basic full body massage unless the client requests otherwise.

I never use lubricant when working on the face. I rarely do fascial work on the face, NEVER if they've had plastic surgery. I find positional release and very gentle trigger point techniques can do wonders for TMJ issues. Most of my clients seem to enjoy face work, especially when I either relieve their pain or if they really want to just drift into la-la land.

I have heard good things about Bellavi Facelift Massage, but I don't know much about it.
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Re: massaging the face

Post by Trae » Tue Jul 21, 2009 7:10 am

At the chiro office I work at, I'll do some facial work if the person has sinus issues, but at the pain clinic I usually offer to do it as part of a 90 minute swedish massage. I always ask first because there is alot of people who do not want their faces touched. I was a cosmetologist before becming a MT so I know many different manipulations that are very relaxing. In beauty school we learned to only use the middle and ring fingers because the index finger is too strong and the pinky is too short. And as mentioned, we learned to always work upward to "lift" the skin.

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Re: massaging the face

Post by Rose of Sharon » Tue Jul 21, 2009 2:38 pm

I love giving and receiving facial massage. Client preference always rules, but when I am client, go for it, John!!

I don't use lubricants on the face unless it is requested.

I have many times wondered why the skin on our faces is thought to be so much more delicate than anywhere else, though. It would be nice to find out one way or the other. Mine doesn't seem the least bit more fragile than the skin anywhere else on my body. My theory on wrinkles (theory meaning I have no documentation, but my observation is....) that genetics play the biggest role in their development, followed by smoking and other lifestyle choices. Of my elderly clients, those who have always cared for their skin (their words) don't seem to have any advantage. If they were genetically predisposed to wrinkle, they have wrinkles. So I enjoy my massage and don't worry about it! ;)
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Re: massaging the face

Post by bones » Tue Jul 28, 2009 9:32 pm

I usually consider the face as an extra area, depending on the client; If I have the time left over, I'll do it. I actually like having my face massaged, so I know it can great for others as well. Always make sure to wash your hands first, though. You've been touching their body, and whatever you may use to massage (cream, oil, etc). so it's not exactly appealing if you don't.

I don't know how you could possibly convince them otherwise about the wrinkles, but maybe you can just mention that you're actually smoothing them out? I mean, you ARE, afterall.

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Re: massaging the face

Post by jacqueline » Sat Aug 08, 2009 6:53 pm

Most of my clients want a face massage..but I do always ask them first..

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Re: massaging the face

Post by pueppi » Mon Aug 10, 2009 7:48 am

johnnymac wrote:I have had a couple of clients who don't want their face done, due to it causing wrinkles. :shock: .Could anyone give me some sound advice or or some documention that may make them change their minds.
pueppi wrote:...google research on it (I'll also look--> on a day when I have time).
So, I got a little time to do a very quick google search. Here are some tidbits that may help you. Maybe they will get your wheels rolling.
Anti-Wrinkles Tips
There are many procedures you can follow to reduce the sign of wrinkles, combat wrinkles or fight the aging process by following these tips:-

1) Stop smoking – smoking is not only bad for your lungs and general health, it also speeds up the aging process and damages your skin.

2) Change your diet – fighting wrinkles demands that you change your diet to a more suitable, well balanced and healthy eating program. Lots of vegetables, fruit and less fatty, acidic food.

3) Drink lots of water – drinking water can moisturize your skin and give it a supple complexion.

4) Avoid stress or worry – ever heard of the phrase “worry lines”? Stress contributes to wrinkles so try to avoid stressful situations or emotional distress.

5) Reduce sun exposure – one of the biggest factors behind aging and wrinkles is excessive exposure to the sun. Remember to use sun block whenever exposed to the sun.

6) Facial exercise – yes that’s right. Massage your face and do routine facial exercises to tighten up saggy skin or firm loose skin. A toned face is less susceptible to wrinkles. Ignore the myth that facial exercises cause wrinkles – it’s false and the complete opposite.

7) Reduce alcohol intake – alcohol can damage your skin, reduce your consumption. Wine on the other hand has shown to contain anti-wrinkle fighting qualities. As ever though, everything in moderation.

8 ) Moisturize your skin daily using creams, lotions or shower gel instead of using soap which can rob your skin of it’s natural moisturizing oils.

9) Selective use of skin care products
- some skin care products do more harm than good, look for ones that contain Vitamin A agents or don’t block out natural skin producing oils.

10) Keep yourself fit – a healthy mind is a healthy body and vice versa. Take care of yourself, keep fit, energy is a powerful stimulant for the body and can give off a healthy glow to your skin.
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Re: massaging the face

Post by ccMarie » Mon Aug 10, 2009 8:26 am

pueppi wrote:
Anti-Wrinkles Tips
There are many procedures you can follow to reduce the sign of wrinkles, combat wrinkles or fight the aging process by following these tips:-

6) Facial exercise – yes that’s right. Massage your face and do routine facial exercises to tighten up saggy skin or firm loose skin. A toned face is less susceptible to wrinkles. Ignore the myth that facial exercises cause wrinkles – it’s false and the complete opposite.
I had to chime in. I went to a yoga retreat a few years ago, and Rose Tran taught us a class of facial yoga. It is AMAZING, and literally just about anyone can do it. Here is a link with some sample poses, and they pretty much cover all bases.
Facial Yoga Sample Poses

And, if the client doesn't want their face included, I just don't push it.
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Re: massaging the face

Post by AngelaJudy » Tue Aug 11, 2009 3:53 pm

Face massage is known to tone the face and improve the complexion.

I don't give a face massage too often because most of my clients either are wearing makeup or are going back to work. When I do, I give light upward and outward strokes to the forehead, Small circles to the temples, Gentle pincement to the eyebrows, cheeks and jaw line(it feels so good). I'll give gentle circular friction around their gums(after asking if they have any tooth or gum pains) and end with some light fingertip tapotement and feathery strokes. My clients love it!
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Re: massaging the face

Post by [email protected] » Fri Dec 25, 2009 10:03 pm

This is an old post, but I will throw my 2 cents in anyways!
I personally love to add facial and scalp massage at the end of a client session! I always feel that most people don't get enough "face" contact, and if done properly (at each client's preference of course!) that it feels wonderful, is very relaxing, and actually helps with increasing collagen and elastin production in the facial skin (also if can create a "plumper and fresh" face!).


... But maybe I have a preference for facial massage since I also went to esthetics school (Didn't get to finish, but I hope to someday!)? It has been very interesting to see other people's views on this subject!
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